Cooking in High Elevation

Living at an elevation of 5430 ft means a lot of things, and it definitely means cooking is different from most places. It’s dry and arid, and most importantly, the air pressure is lower.

That means, water boiling point is lower, things take longer to cook. Baking goods rise a lot easier. Doughs need more water than sea-level preparation. So, when you find my recipe timing, or temperature, or liquid volume a bit *off*, please adjust and tweak the recipes according to your liking and your location.

If you are living in even higher elevation than me, then a great guide I found was here, suggestions made from research done by CSU:

http://www.ext.colostate.edu/pubs/foodnut/p41.html#cook

I find this brochure tremendously helpful especially when I cook somewhere at low elevation and I use the advice reversely. It constantly reminds me of how a change in the environment affects the technique and the outcome.

Enjoy cooking! 🙂

Pickled duck gizzards

Lots of Chinese eat seasonally like rituals, so does my mum. When it got to the tail end of spring and summer time lurked, my mum would start to make tons of seasonal dishes, pickling some duck gizzards was one of these dishes. I got some already cleaned duck gizzards in nearby Asian market and decided to follow my mum’s suit.

Ingredients:
1 lbs of duck gizzards
3 cloves of garlic, minced
1 thumb-sized ginger root, peeled and minced
2 green onions, finely chopped
3-4 red chili peppers, chopped
1 tbsp coconut oil
1/2 cup Chinese cooking wine
1 cup Chinese wine pickling sauce
Salt and pepper

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Heat up the coconut oil in a pan in medium-high heat. Add garlic, ginger, green onion, and red chili peppers. Stir fry until smelling the spices’ aroma. Add salt and pepper to taste. Turn the heat off and set the pan aside.

Heat up 4 cups of water in a kettle and another 4 cups in a pot until boil on medium heat. Add gizzards into the pot and let cook for 3-5 min. Drain the water in the pot and run icy cold water on the gizzards for about 1 min. Pour the boiled water from the kettle in the pot and transfer the gizzards back into the boiling water in the pot. Add the spice mixture from the pan to the pot. Let simmer on medium to low heat for about 10-35 min depending on how cooked you want the gizzards be. Add salt and pepper to taste. Take out all the gizzards and run icy cold water on the gizzards for another 1 min. If you cook the gizzards in the water long enough, with all the spice mixture in it, you can reuse the broth for other things — I made some pho with that broth. 🙂

In a air-tight container, add the gizzards, throw in some of the spice mixture, cooking wine and pickling sauce. Refrigerate the container and wait for at least 2 days. Slice up the gizzards before serving.

Serve it as a cold appetizer by itself with a bottle of cold light beer, or get creative. I threw a few slices on husband’s grilled cheese sandwich the other day and as someone just tried the gizzards for the very first time, he was pleasantly surprised and thoroughly enjoyed it! 🙂
Hope you will like them as much as I do too!

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

PS. I made this quick noodle dish that took literally under 15 min that used duck gizzards as the side protein and garnished it with a lot of colorful vegetables. Another way to eat the gizzards. 🙂

Sichuan-style aromatic spicy frog legs

When it comes to eating, the Chinese and the French seem to be in sync on a lot of notes – so is the case with frogs. On a frog, the most delicious part is frog legs, it is meaty, tender, and juicy with a mild flavor which can be easily seasoned into anything you like. I love frog legs, they were definitely a treat during my childhood when my mum had a craving for frogs. Lol. Today, I am going to prepare a dish that is spicy, savory and well-balanced using frog legs.

Ingredients:
4-5 full frog bottoms or 8-10 individual frog legs (chopped into pieces according to joints, optional)
2 stems of green onions, finely chopped, separate the root white parts and the top parts
4-6 red chili peppers, chopped
2 tbsp of ginger, sliced
2 cloves of garlic, minced
1/2 slab of rock candy
4-5 tbsp of spicy bean paste
1 tbsp of soy sauce
3-4 tbsp of coconut oil
1 tbsp of sesame oil
4-5 tbsp of Chinese cooking wine
Salt and pepper

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Clean the frog legs and put all of them in a container, pour in the Chinese cooking wine, rub in salt and pepper, let sit for at least 10 min.

Heat up coconut oil in a large wok. Turn the heat to medium and add rock candy and red chili peppers. Keep stirring until the candy melts and one can smell some aroma coming from frying the chili peppers. Add root parts of green onions, ginger, garlic, and spicy bean paste. Turn the heat to medium-high and stir until you see the oil turns reddish.

Turn the heat up to high. Throw in the frogs with the cooking wine. Stir constantly and turn the frog legs to make sure the largest thigh pieces turn white and opaque. Add the top parts of the green onion and the soy sauce. Stir to mix well. Add the sesame oil. Salt and pepper to taste.

Once the frog legs all turn white and opaque, put on a lid and turn the heat back to medium. Let simmer for about 5-8 min. If the meat falls of the bone with slightest touch with fork, then the frog meat is fully cooked. Serve immediately.

It was such a wonderful treat! I am looking forward to cooking the other package of frogs a different way! Thanks for checking in! 🙂