Pickled duck gizzards

Lots of Chinese eat seasonally like rituals, so does my mum. When it got to the tail end of spring and summer time lurked, my mum would start to make tons of seasonal dishes, pickling some duck gizzards was one of these dishes. I got some already cleaned duck gizzards in nearby Asian market and decided to follow my mum’s suit.

Ingredients:
1 lbs of duck gizzards
3 cloves of garlic, minced
1 thumb-sized ginger root, peeled and minced
2 green onions, finely chopped
3-4 red chili peppers, chopped
1 tbsp coconut oil
1/2 cup Chinese cooking wine
1 cup Chinese wine pickling sauce
Salt and pepper

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Heat up the coconut oil in a pan in medium-high heat. Add garlic, ginger, green onion, and red chili peppers. Stir fry until smelling the spices’ aroma. Add salt and pepper to taste. Turn the heat off and set the pan aside.

Heat up 4 cups of water in a kettle and another 4 cups in a pot until boil on medium heat. Add gizzards into the pot and let cook for 3-5 min. Drain the water in the pot and run icy cold water on the gizzards for about 1 min. Pour the boiled water from the kettle in the pot and transfer the gizzards back into the boiling water in the pot. Add the spice mixture from the pan to the pot. Let simmer on medium to low heat for about 10-35 min depending on how cooked you want the gizzards be. Add salt and pepper to taste. Take out all the gizzards and run icy cold water on the gizzards for another 1 min. If you cook the gizzards in the water long enough, with all the spice mixture in it, you can reuse the broth for other things — I made some pho with that broth. 🙂

In a air-tight container, add the gizzards, throw in some of the spice mixture, cooking wine and pickling sauce. Refrigerate the container and wait for at least 2 days. Slice up the gizzards before serving.

Serve it as a cold appetizer by itself with a bottle of cold light beer, or get creative. I threw a few slices on husband’s grilled cheese sandwich the other day and as someone just tried the gizzards for the very first time, he was pleasantly surprised and thoroughly enjoyed it! 🙂
Hope you will like them as much as I do too!

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PS. I made this quick noodle dish that took literally under 15 min that used duck gizzards as the side protein and garnished it with a lot of colorful vegetables. Another way to eat the gizzards. 🙂

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Shanghainese red braised pork belly

Have you ever thought about replacing “honey-glazed ham” with something else, potentially more divine for your holiday celebration? What about some sweet and savory braised pork belly?

Pork belly?! Does not sound very appetizing? What about this? Bacons? Better? Better yet, bacon IS pork belly, it is nothing but thinly sliced pork belly – but pork belly can be so much more and beyond! 😛

I cooked this traditional Shanghainese household dish during Christmas and received many compliments over how salivating this dish was. This dish is THE dish that will remind most of the Shanghainese kids of home. And today, let’s make this dish and satisfy your tummy!

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Ingredients:
2 lbs of pork belly (after cooking the meat shrinks about 30-40%, 2 lbs probably last 5-6 people for one meal, I cooked about 4 lbs of pork belly on Christmas Eve), chopped into 1 cubic inch chunks – the chunks should be cut so that lean/fat/lean/fat/… layers alternate and see picture below for reference.
Soy sauce, about 1 cup
Rock sugar or slab sugar, about 1 – 1.5 cup
Coconut oil, about 1/2 cup
Star anise, 5 – 6
Sichuan peppercorn, 10 – 15
Cinnamon bark, a few small pieces
Salt and pepper
Chinese cooking wine, 1/2 cup

Heat up coconut oil in a large wok and prepare a dutch oven/Chinese ceramic pot on the side. Add the sugar while turning heat to medium-high. Continuously break down the sugar by stirring until the sugar completely melts and the mixture of oil and sugar will look a little brown. Add the pork chunks and stir fast until all the pork chunks are coated with sugar/oil mix.

Quickly dish all the pork into the dutch oven/ceramic pot. Add cooking wine, soy sauce, star anise, Sichuan peppercorn, and cinnamon bark pieces. Set the heat on low and let simmer for at least 1.5 hours but not necessarily longer than 3 hours. Add water in the process if needed. About 15 -20 min before finishing, add salt and pepper and let cook till done.

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The meat should be extremely tender and juicy – when eating it, the fat layer melts in your mouth while the lean part provide a tiny bit of resistance. And the sauce bursts out so easily, it was the most fabulous thing! It is salty from soy sauce and sweet from the sugar and once reaching the balance between the two, the finished dish is to die for!

If you do not have enough meat, you can add a few hard boiled eggs or tough tofu chunks into the ceramic pot to bulk up the dish volume. I understand this will be tough competition but I hope once you tried this way of eating pork belly, you will never miss bacon again! 🙂

Scallion oil noodles – delicious Shanghai street food

Scallion oil noodles (“cong you ban mian”, noodles mixed with scallions and oil) can be found in most breakfast places. And is is a super easy dish to make at home.

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Ingredients:
Flour noodles, preferably narrow thin ones
Sesame oil or vegetable oil
Chopped up scallions (or use green onions for substitute)
Sugar, 2-3 teaspoons
Soy sauce, 2-3 tablespoons

In a small pot, add a few drops of oil and scallions. In medium heat, cook until you can smell the aroma from the scallions and add soy sauce. Add sugar in 10 -20 seconds or so. Stir to mix everything well and cook until the sauce start to sizzle. Another thing to look for, is the color of the scallions, they should be coated with soy sauce and sugar and appear to be dark brown. Remove from heat.

Boil water in a large pot and throw in the noodles. Cook for about 2 minutes. Pour out the hot water and add in cold water, bring to boil again. Run icy cold water through the cooked noodles for about 5 seconds. Drain all the water and set the noodles aside.

Dish out the noodles in a bowl, add the sauce to the noodles. Usually a few spoonful of sauce is all you need per person (it can get too salty if too much sauce is added to the noodles). Mix the sauce well into the noodles. Serve immediately!

You can add other stuff on top of the noodles, such as pickled ginger, seaweed bits, white sesame seeds, stir fried vegetables, etc. In Shanghai, adding dried shrimp bits is common too.

This makes me miss home, Shanghai! 😛